Tag Archive: Weather


Do you have a plan in place in case of a weather emergency? Do you know what you  can do to prepare your kids? The Weather Channel has come up with a list of what to do in the case of a weather emergency.

Follow these tips to ensure the welfare of your family:

  • Keep an eye on children’s emotional reactions to severe weather. Talk to children – and just as important – listen to them. Encourage kids to express how they feel and ask if anything is worrying them.
  • Regardless of age, reassure them frequently that you, local officials, and their communities are all working to keep them safe and to return life back to normal. Older children may seem more capable but may also be affected by the displacement in their lives.
  • Watch for symptoms of stress, including clinginess, stomach aches, headaches, nightmares, trouble eating or sleeping, or changes in behavior.
  • After the storm, supervise children closely and inspect those areas in which they are playing. Gullies, downed electric wires, and sharp debris are just a few of the hazards children may encounter following severe weather.
  • If you are concerned about the way your children are responding long after severe weather, consult your doctor, school counselor or local mental health professional.

(List was prepared by  http://bereadyweather.com/kids)

Fema has a website for kids that will help them prepare and learn about Weather Emergencies. Its colorful and has a lot of cool fact and important information.

http://www.fema.gov/kids/

Do you have a plan in place in case of a weather emergency? Do you know what you  tornado? The Weather Channel has come up with a list of what to do when preparing  for, during and after a tornado.

BEWARE OF HOW, WHEN AND WHERE TORNADOES STRIKE

  • Tornadoes can and do occur in every state in the country.
  • Tornadoes usually accompany thunderstorms, but not always.
  • A tornado may follow sunshine or be totally enshrouded in heavy rain.
  • Sometimes the air is eerily calm before a tornado hits; in other cases it is preceded by strong, gusty winds.
  • Large hail and tornadoes can be produced by the same thunderstorms. However, many hailstorms are not accompanied by tornadoes, and vice versa.
  • Tornadoes assume a variety of sizes and shapes, from the traditional Wizard of Oz-like funnel to snake-like “multiple vortices.” They can also assume a drawn-out rope shape or a wide, churning, “smoky” appearance.
  • The sound of a tornado has been compared to a freight train or jet engine, but there is no guarantee that you will hear such a noise before it strikes.

PREPARE AND TAKE ACTION

Although there is an advance warning period, be aware that tornadoes can change direction, speed and intensity quickly. Make a plan to prepare and protect the people and things you value before severe weather strikes.

  • Take a photograph of your valuables and store them in a waterproof/fire resistant safe deposit box.
  • Assemble a Family Disaster Kit.
  • Depending on your location, you might be told to evacuate before a warning or even a watch is issued. Notify someone unaffected by the storm as to your whereabouts.
  • Familiarize yourself with school or workplace emergency action plans and identify appropriate officials in command during an emergency.
  • Make sure to charge your mobile phone, laptop and other mobile device batteries.

After the tornado:

  • Stay away from downed power lines, and be sure to report them to your utility company.
  • Stay away from damaged buildings.
  • Evacuate if you smell fumes or gas and notify emergency personnel.
  • Do not run a gasoline-powered generator indoors.

WHAT TO DO IF THERE IS A TORNADO WARNING

In a frame home:

  • Seek shelter in the lowest level of your home. If there is no basement, go to an interior hallway, a smaller interior room or a closet. Keep away from all windows.
  • Get updates on TV from The Weather Channel, online at weather.com, or The Weather Channel mobile web and mobile apps.
  • Keep your Family Disaster Kit with you.
  • Make sure a battery-powered radio and spare batteries are nearby in case of power outage.
  • Keep your pet on a leash or in a carrier.
  • Cushion yourself with a mattress, but do not use one to cover up. Cover your head and eyes with a blanket to protect against flying debris and broken glass.
  • Be aware that multiple tornadoes can emerge from the same storm.
  • Do not leave your shelter until the tornado warning expires.
  • Obey advisories promptly.

In a mobile home:

Outside:

  • Seek shelter indoors, in a protected space with no windows.
  • If you cannot get inside, lie flat in a ditch or low-lying area. Cover your head and neck with your arms or a piece of clothing.

In a car:

  • Drive away from the tornado if time and roads permit.
  • If the tornado is imminent, get out of the car and into a sturdy building or ditch, away from the car.

In a school, workplace, or other building:

  • Evacuate portable classrooms.
  • Move students into interior hallways, small interior rooms, or stairways on the lowest level.
  • Avoid using gymnasiums, auditoriums or other large, open-space areas.

(List was prepared by http://bereadyweather.com/tornadoes)

Prepare Your Pets for Weather Emergencies

Do you have a plan in place in case of a weather emergency? Do you know what you would do in the event of a tornado, hurricane flood, blizzard or wild fire? What would you do with your pets? The Weather Channel has come up with a list of what to do when preparing  for, during and after a weather emergency.

 

Before the storm:

  • Bring outdoor animals inside with a carrier large enough for them to turn around and lie down comfortably.
  • Review your evacuation plan and double-check emergency supplies, medications, bowls, water and food.
  • Plan multiple routes to higher elevations and a safe destination. Avoid routes near bridges and plan out a safe walking route.
  • Make sure your pets are wearing collars and IDs; take their vaccination papers and photos in case you become separated and need to identify your pets if they are rescued to a shelter.
  • Stock extra pet supplies in your car.
  • Never leave pets home alone during a flood watch or warning. If water rises too fast, you may not be able to get back to them. If you can’t evacuate large animals, take them to high ground and do not tether them.
  • If you must leave your pets when evacuating, plan ahead to leave them with a neighbor, relative or friend who can care for them during severe weather.
  • Practice loading and driving large animals in a trailer.
  • Maintain a waterproof box with halters, leads, medications, and bandages.

During the storm:

  • If an evacuation is possible, take your pets with you. Make sure you take your pet’s emergency supplies, bowls, food, water and proper identification.
  • If you cannot evacuate, choose a safe room for riding out the storm – an interior room without windows – and take your entire family and pets there.
  • Pets should be put in crates or carriers in the safe room. If possible, place the crates under a sturdy piece of furniture.
  • Stay tuned to emergency channels and heed instructions.
  • Keep your emergency supplies in the safe room with you.
  • As pets may become frightened during the storm, know your pets’ hiding places.
  • Secure exits and dog/cat doors so pets can’t escape into the storm.
  • Do not tranquilize your pets. They’ll need their survival instincts in severe weather.

After the storm:

  • Uncertainty and change in the environment also affect animals, presenting new stresses and dangers. Keep your pets on a leash and use caution allowing your pets outdoors.
  • Your pets’ behavior may change after a crisis, becoming more aggressive or self-protective. Be sensitive to these changes and keep more room between them, other animals, children or strangers.
  • Allow pets to become re-oriented. Familiar scents and landmarks may be altered and could cause your pet to become confused or lost.
  • As displaced objects and fallen trees can disorient pets, and sharp or toxic debris could harm them, keep pets close at hand.
  • Animals may be at more risk FOR DEVELOPING various diseases that accompany natural disasters. Consult your veterinarian if your pet displays any unusual physical symptoms, and determine if any precautionary measures should be considered.
  • Assess the damage yourself before bringing your pets outside with you.
  • Keep pets away from food, water or liquids that could have been contaminated from the storm.
  • Use caution when returning home and walking on higher ground. Snakes, insects and other animals may have found refuge there.

(List was prepared by http://bereadyweather.com/pets)

%d bloggers like this: