Tag Archive: hurricane


Do you have a plan in place in case of a weather emergency? Do you know what you  can do to prepare your kids? The Weather Channel has come up with a list of what to do in the case of a weather emergency.

Follow these tips to ensure the welfare of your family:

  • Keep an eye on children’s emotional reactions to severe weather. Talk to children – and just as important – listen to them. Encourage kids to express how they feel and ask if anything is worrying them.
  • Regardless of age, reassure them frequently that you, local officials, and their communities are all working to keep them safe and to return life back to normal. Older children may seem more capable but may also be affected by the displacement in their lives.
  • Watch for symptoms of stress, including clinginess, stomach aches, headaches, nightmares, trouble eating or sleeping, or changes in behavior.
  • After the storm, supervise children closely and inspect those areas in which they are playing. Gullies, downed electric wires, and sharp debris are just a few of the hazards children may encounter following severe weather.
  • If you are concerned about the way your children are responding long after severe weather, consult your doctor, school counselor or local mental health professional.

(List was prepared by  http://bereadyweather.com/kids)

Fema has a website for kids that will help them prepare and learn about Weather Emergencies. Its colorful and has a lot of cool fact and important information.

http://www.fema.gov/kids/

Do you have a plan in place in case of a weather emergency? Do you know what you  hurricane? The Weather Channel has come up with a list of what to do when preparing  for, during and after a hurricane.

PREPARE AND TAKE ACTION

Although there is an advance warning period, be aware that hurricanes can change direction, speed and intensity quickly. Make a plan to prepare and protect the people and things you value before severe weather strikes.

  • Create a written emergency preparedness and action plan for your family and business.
  • Visit your insurance agent now. Review insurance coverage for your home and business. Determine your flood insurance eligibility – homeowners insurance typically does not cover flood damage.
  • Buy plywood or shutters for protecting windows. Trim trees to lessen flying debris.
  • Find out if you live in a hurricane evacuation zone by contacting your local emergency management office. Make an evacuation plan if you live in an area vulnerable to storm surge or fresh water flooding.
  • Identify the evacuation route you will use if told to evacuate. Determine the nearest low-rise building outside of flood zones where you can evacuate – an official public shelter, a hotel, or a friend’s or relative’s home. Find out if where you’re going will accept pets.
  • Identify two places where family members can meet if separated: one outside your home and another outside your neighborhood.
  • Obtain emergency supplies, including at least a 3-day supply of water (a gallon per person per day) and non-perishable food.
  • Test emergency equipment such as generators and flashlights.
  • Decide where you will store your boat during a tropical storm or hurricane, and factor into your action plan the time to move it to storage.

If a watch is issued:

  • Fill vehicles with gas.
  • Get extra cash.
  • Fill prescriptions.
  • For mobile homes, secure tie-downs and prepare to evacuate when ordered.
  • Bring in loose objects from outside.

If a warning is issued:

  • Secure all windows with shutters or plywood.
  • Place valuables and important papers in a waterproof container and store on highest floor of home.

If you are advised or ordered to evacuate:

  • Follow all directions and orders from local officials, and leave immediately when instructed to do so.
  • Bring emergency supplies, including a first aid kit, medicines, food, water, formula and diapers, toiletries, cell phones, radios, and batteries.
  • Bring extra cash and copies of important papers such as insurance policies.
  • Bring blankets, sleeping bags, books, and games.
  • Unplug appliances, turn off utilities such as electricity and the main water valve.
  • Lock windows and doors of your home.

If you are not told to evacuate:

  • Stay at home! Leave the roads available for those who must evacuate.
  • Clean bathtub with bleach, fill with water for washing and flushing (not drinking).
  • Set fridge to maximum cold and keep closed.
  • Turn off utilities if told to do so by local officials.

During the storm:

  • Go to an interior room and stay away from windows and doors, even though they’re covered.
  • During very strong winds, lie under something sturdy.
  • Do not go outside, including during passage of the eye.

After the storm:

  • First responders may be delayed in reaching your community or impacted area for a prolonged period.
  • Avoid roads covered by water and/or debris, and avoid downed power lines.
  • Only use a generator in a well-ventilated area and adhere to all manufacturer’s instructions.
  • Use flashlights instead of candles.

(List was prepared by http://bereadyweather.com/hurricanes)

Prepare Your Pets for Weather Emergencies

Do you have a plan in place in case of a weather emergency? Do you know what you would do in the event of a tornado, hurricane flood, blizzard or wild fire? What would you do with your pets? The Weather Channel has come up with a list of what to do when preparing  for, during and after a weather emergency.

 

Before the storm:

  • Bring outdoor animals inside with a carrier large enough for them to turn around and lie down comfortably.
  • Review your evacuation plan and double-check emergency supplies, medications, bowls, water and food.
  • Plan multiple routes to higher elevations and a safe destination. Avoid routes near bridges and plan out a safe walking route.
  • Make sure your pets are wearing collars and IDs; take their vaccination papers and photos in case you become separated and need to identify your pets if they are rescued to a shelter.
  • Stock extra pet supplies in your car.
  • Never leave pets home alone during a flood watch or warning. If water rises too fast, you may not be able to get back to them. If you can’t evacuate large animals, take them to high ground and do not tether them.
  • If you must leave your pets when evacuating, plan ahead to leave them with a neighbor, relative or friend who can care for them during severe weather.
  • Practice loading and driving large animals in a trailer.
  • Maintain a waterproof box with halters, leads, medications, and bandages.

During the storm:

  • If an evacuation is possible, take your pets with you. Make sure you take your pet’s emergency supplies, bowls, food, water and proper identification.
  • If you cannot evacuate, choose a safe room for riding out the storm – an interior room without windows – and take your entire family and pets there.
  • Pets should be put in crates or carriers in the safe room. If possible, place the crates under a sturdy piece of furniture.
  • Stay tuned to emergency channels and heed instructions.
  • Keep your emergency supplies in the safe room with you.
  • As pets may become frightened during the storm, know your pets’ hiding places.
  • Secure exits and dog/cat doors so pets can’t escape into the storm.
  • Do not tranquilize your pets. They’ll need their survival instincts in severe weather.

After the storm:

  • Uncertainty and change in the environment also affect animals, presenting new stresses and dangers. Keep your pets on a leash and use caution allowing your pets outdoors.
  • Your pets’ behavior may change after a crisis, becoming more aggressive or self-protective. Be sensitive to these changes and keep more room between them, other animals, children or strangers.
  • Allow pets to become re-oriented. Familiar scents and landmarks may be altered and could cause your pet to become confused or lost.
  • As displaced objects and fallen trees can disorient pets, and sharp or toxic debris could harm them, keep pets close at hand.
  • Animals may be at more risk FOR DEVELOPING various diseases that accompany natural disasters. Consult your veterinarian if your pet displays any unusual physical symptoms, and determine if any precautionary measures should be considered.
  • Assess the damage yourself before bringing your pets outside with you.
  • Keep pets away from food, water or liquids that could have been contaminated from the storm.
  • Use caution when returning home and walking on higher ground. Snakes, insects and other animals may have found refuge there.

(List was prepared by http://bereadyweather.com/pets)

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